What is Slow Travel?

Slow travel is a mindset that rejects traditional ideas of tourism and encourages you to soak in your environments and keep yourself open to new experiences. — The Art of Slow Travel¹

Slow travel is about the journey, not just the destination. Being excited about where you’re going, but being just as excited by how you get there, the people you meet, the sights you see and the experiences you have along the way. About slowing down to acknowledge that the journey you’re on allows, for the briefest moment, the chance to peer into someone else’s life and to share that moment in time with them. — The Travel Word²

There’s an awful lot of clutter in modern life, and the only logical antidote to clutter is simplicity. Slow travel excels at simplicity. Freed from the pressure of ‘seeing everything’, you can actually relax a bit and enjoy your holiday. There’s a better chance you’ll meet local people, see a few sights off the traditional tourist path and get an appreciation for a different way of life (which some would argue is the whole point of travel in the first place). — Intrepid Travel³

3 Slow Travel Myths to Bust Before Your Next Trip

Myth #1: Slow travel has a minimum duration of one week. You don’t have to spend a certain amount of time in a place in order for it to qualify as slow travel. I’ve read a bunch of articles that state you must travel for a minimum of a week in order for it to be slow travel. But, slow travel is a mindset and approach that can be applied to any length of travel — even an afternoon outing in your hometown. If anything, slow traveling on your shorter trips is good practice for when you take a longer trip.

Myth #2: Slow travel means physically traveling as slowly as possible. It’s about traveling at the right speed. Pacing instead of rushing. Finding the right balance between too fast and too slow.

Myth #3: Slow travel is anti-technology. There’s a big difference between digital minimalism and being opposed to all technology. Digital minimalism simply advocates for technology to be used as a tool (instead of technology using us). Technology can be a great tool while you travel — just don’t let it get in the way!

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